Factcheck exposes inaccuracies in 2006 campaigns

Factcheck has been reporting from the campaign trail once again this year. They just published their summary: The Whoppers Of 2006 — We review the worst deceptions from House and Senate campaigns.

Summary

The mid-term elections of 2006 brought an unprecedented barrage of advertising containing much that is false or misleading. We found examples of disregard for facts and honesty – on both sides – that would get a reporter fired in a heartbeat from any decent news organization.

Candidates, parties and independent groups have faked quotes, twisted words, misrepresented votes and positions, and engaged in rank fear-mongering and outright fabrication. Here we review some of the worst deceptions we found.

Analysis

We haven’t addressed every false or misleading statement in 2006 House and Senate campaigns – there were too many of them and our resources are too limited for that. For the full record of our work please refer to the earlier articles on the home page and in our archive.

Disregard for Facts

Much of what we found went well beyond the bounds of honest advocacy, and would warrant dismissal for any reporter who tried to pass it off as an accurate news story. We believe reasonable citizens will also find these distortions to be unacceptable even in political advertising, where a certain amount of puffery is expected and tolerated. It’s one thing to present your own case in the best light and to point out the flaws in your opponent. But a lot of what we encountered was far from the truth. …

Factcheck is a great service and recently won PoliticsOnline’s The Top 10 Who are Changing the World of Internet and Politics award.

Update 2006/11/05: In the title, it must say “inaccuracies” (not “accuracies”).

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