Archive for January, 2009

DLD Internet Politics Study

Monday, January 26th, 2009

For those interested in internet politics and online campaigning in Germany, the recently released “DLD Internet Politics Study” (article, PDF download) may be of interest.

I left the following comment to point out a slight error (re-posting it here while it’s awaiting approval):

DLD_Internet_Politics_20_01_09.pdf (page 18)

The study may contain a slight oversight.

On page 18 (PDF), the title suggests that the site “Can We Ask” somehow encouraged video dialogue with candidate Obama as part of the Obama campaign’s official toolkit (along with Flickr, Eventful and the other tools listed on the previous pages).

However, “Can We Ask” was a negative campaigning micro-site paid for by the Republican National Committee (RNC). According to Republican internet strategist David All, it was “an extremely clever deployment of YouTube to effectively hammer Barrack Obama by blending the RNC’s opposition research team with real questions submitted by real citizens.” (Source: http://bit.ly/3dcl)

The site is still live: http://net.gop.com/canweask/

The screenshot used in the study (see image above) does not show the disclaimer or footer information. But if you look closely the main link below the video include says “A Questionable Candidate” (in German: “ein zweifelhafter Kandidat”) which pretty much gives it away that this is not in support of Obama.

Nice to see that the presentation contains a few screenshots from the Flickr pool I created a few weeks ago.

My most favorite use of Twitter this past year

Wednesday, January 21st, 2009

Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at NYU and avid Twitterer (btw, must-follow for anyone interested in the future of media and journalism), was preparing an essay recently on “why I use Twitter”: Help Me Explain Twitter to Eggheads

He asked his readers for contributions on one particular item:

9. And then, the thing I need your help with: what do I actually use Twitter for?.

I have a number of answers to that, which I will lay out in the piece, but I would like to feature some others. The intent of my question is to put the accent on “useful.” What do you use Twitter for? I’m especially interested if you’re an academic—student, teacher, PhD—but my interest is not limited to those groups.

Here’s my answer (sent via Twitter, natch):

@jayrosen_nyu To follow people outside my liberal, Bay Area echo chamber. Hard to bear at times, but can be great sanity check. ;-)

Following last year’s trip to DC (Politics Online conference, eDemocracyCamp) and Austin (SXSW), I made a deliberate attempt to follow more people who are not like me (in terms of where we fall on the political spectrum — we all have in common that we are hooked on Twitter, apparently): Republicans, conservatives, evangelicals etc.

This has proven to be my most valuable use of Twitter by far. It has provided me with a glimpse into the other half of this nation’s soul, which has been so deeply divided over the last eight years (and still is, though I’m hopeful that now is a good time for new beginnings, and maybe we will see some of this division disappear).

It’s been fascinating to read up on some of the articles, stories and other resources that are being passed on by conservatives, to listen to their instant feedback to news of the day, and to follow the discussions around the need for change in their own party.

It is easier today than ever to blend out any news source we don’t agree with and only engage with people who will confirm our views. It is important, in my view, that we resist this temptation, and Twitter seems to be a good antenna into anywhere outside the bubbles of our own limited world views.