Archive for October, 2007

eDemocracyCamp: March 1-2, 2008 in Washington DC

Tuesday, October 16th, 2007

I thought this might be a fun thing to try: eDemocracyCamp

Sign up on the wiki if you’re interested in attending or want to help out with organizing.

This is the weekend immediately prior to 2008 Politics Online Conference, and of course the idea is to get a hold of some of the folks who will be in town anyway.

Still plenty of time left, still early idea stage. Let’s see how this goes…

Dememefication

Friday, October 5th, 2007

Recommended reading on what Web 3.0 isn’t and why:

Stowe Boyd: Jason Calacanis on Web 3.0

I personally feel that Web 2.0 has a long way to play before we can advocate jumping onto some new wave. Have we seen the full culmination of the social revolution going on? No, and I think it will be awhile before we do.

Personally, I feel the vague lineaments of something beyond Web 2.0, and they involve some fairly radical steps. Imagine a Web without browsers. Imagine breaking completely away from the document metaphor, or a true blurring of application and information. That’s what Web 3.0 will be, but I bet we will call it something else.

Tim O’Reilly: Today’s Web 3.0 Nonsense

… There’s definitely something new brewing, but I bet we will call it something other than Web 3.0. And it’s increasingly likely that it will be far broader and more pervasive than the web, as mobile technology, sensors, speech recognition, and many other new technologies make computing far more ambient than it is today.

But in any event, the next meme to take hold will be broad based, with many proof points, each showing another aspect of the discontinuity. Anyone who says his startup is the sign of this next revolution is just out of touch.

I find myself particularly irritated by definitions of “Web 3.0″ that are basically descriptions of Web 2.0 (i.e. new forms of collective intelligence applications) that justify themselves as breakthroughs only by pretending that Web 2.0 is somehow about ajax, mashups, and other client side technologies.

So there you have it. What we need is better imagination, and less of the versioning.

Btw, Stowe had another nice article on the social graph meme that’s currently making its rounds: Dave McClure Is Wrong, Continued: Social Graph v Social Network

Startup costs

Friday, October 5th, 2007

Great article over at Guy Kawasaki’s blog: Financial Models for Underachievers: Two Years of the Real Numbers of a Startup

Numbers like these don’t get shared with the public very often. Another recent example is German startup Townster’s recollection of their startup costs: Was kostet eine GrĂ¼ndung? (in German)

O'Reilly: Collective intelligence the heart of Web 2.0

Friday, October 5th, 2007

Tim O’Reilly:

“… the idea of collective intelligence, which to me is the heart of Web 2.0.”

Source: O’Reilly Radar, SAP as a Web 2.0 Company?

Wikibook

Thursday, October 4th, 2007

Wiki meets Facebook.

First up, the Wiki Project:

theWikiProject is a place for you, your friends, and your groups to write Web pages together. Using the same software that powers Wikipedia, you can share pages with just a few folks, inside Facebook, or with the whole world at theWikiProject.net!

Another cool feature is a wiki-style Wall, since you can put your own page inside your Facebook profile, and any and all of your friends can edit it.

This is EXPERIMENTAL software by a couple of developers who wanted to use MediaWiki inside of Facebook. We CANNOT GUARANTEE YOUR PRIVACY nor the RELIABILITY OF OUR STORAGE. Yes, it’s on Amazon.com’s servers and we make hourly backups, but this is just a very small project at the moment…

… but if you pitch in and join theWikiProject, we think it could be a whole lot bigger!

Read how the makers of the Wiki Project explain “Why a wiki?

Secondly, Wetpaint launched the beta version of its Wiki Whiteboard app on Monday:

Wiki Whiteboard by Wetpaint makes it simple to work together with friends and groups inside Facebook. Adding content, images, videos, and dozens of other widgets is as easy as clicking and typing.

Who knows, there may already be more wiki apps on Facebook than just these two…