Archive for August, 2006

BarCamp at Stanford during BarCampEarth

Thursday, August 17th, 2006

I’ll be camping out (likely) at BarCamp Stanford, August 25-27. I’d like to follow up on some ideas that came out of NCDD with regard to online deliberation, and maybe continue work on this baby.

Missing out on the Techcrunch Party

Thursday, August 17th, 2006

Sadly, I won’t be able to attend the massive, massive Techcrunch Party this Friday (check out the guest list at the bottom of the page; what percentage of people to you know?*) due to a previously scheduled (and equally promising) dinner meeting in San Francisco.

*I know a meager 2+ percent, but boy am I working on improving that ratio.

I’ll be at SDForum StartUpCamp this Monday

Thursday, August 17th, 2006

Yum, StartUpCamp (Upcoming).

“The first three companies I launched sucked…”

Thursday, August 17th, 2006

I can’t quite remember who told me and where (possibly at CTC 2005 in New York City):

The first three companies I launched sucked.

(slight pause)

But the second three…!

(insert big smile of successful entrepreneur here)

Think it’s a great quote. If you’re the one who said it let me know. I’ll buy you a drink.

What would Jesus buy?

Thursday, August 17th, 2006

What would Jesus Buy? is an upcoming film by Morgan Spurlock of Super Size Me fame. Finally something that caught my eye after months and months of silver screen boredom. Ok, so I may have missed a few good ones recently, but overall Netflix keeps getting a bigger chunk of the pie.

My tagroll

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

Finally, my del.icio.us tagroll is available on my blog. Roll your own here.

My del.icio.us tag cloud

Wednesday, August 16th, 2006

This Monday: 2nd Web Monday Silicon Valley

Friday, August 11th, 2006

A quick reminder to join us this Monday, August 14 for the second ever Web Monday Silicon Valley. We expect to hear about the following three topics:

  • James — Concept and prototypical implementation of an XML-aggregator for multimedia content (Gernot Poetsch)
  • mnemo — An alternative approach for working creatively and investigatively with web sources (Simon Kock)
  • HyperScope — Doug Engelbart‘s latest effort to bring advanced navigation and linking capabilities to the Web (Eugene Eric Kim)

If all goes well, Simon will join us live via the web from Germany.

A big thank you goes to Socialtext, who were so kind to let us into their Palo Alto office.

Please RSVP on the wiki and/or on Upcoming and bring your friends.

The terrorist within

Thursday, August 10th, 2006

With news about the foiled terror plot in Britain still unfolding, it’s still a little early to jump to conclusions. But apparently the people who have been arrested so far were young, British citizens of Asian descent. Sound familiar? So here is what I want to know:

  • Who are their neighbors?
  • Who are their friends?
  • Who are their families?
  • Where do they go to school?
  • Where do they work?
  • Where do they attend service?

Last time I checked terrorists don’t operate in a vacuum: they have everyday needs and do everyday things, too, and need to rely on their immediate social networks. Seems to me like too many people in these communities are turning a blind eye these days.

This is where the real problem lies.

This is also another reason why earlier this year it wasn’t just about cartoons.

NCDD: An Open Evening of Great Conversation

Friday, August 4th, 2006

Susan Partnow hosted An Open Evening of Great Conversation. She gave a one-hour trainig session on how to become a Conversation Cafe host, a very simple approach to achieve deeper and more meaningful conversations. The instructions fit on small piece of paper, anyone can do it, and practically anywhere (in public, at work, at home etc.).

What followed was a 70-minute sample conversation with six to eight people per table. Though the main motive for attending was to learn about and apply this format, it was amazing to see how quickly the conversations (our topic: “Tell about a time in the democratic process when you used your voice and felt heard”) gained a level of quality and intimacy that seems quite rare in today’s world.