Archive for the 'Social Networking' Category

At CommunityNext today

Saturday, February 10th, 2007

I’m at CommunityNext in Stanford today. And when I come back, I will monetize the living #$*! out of you, my dear reader community.

Any important issues I should look out for? Anything you’d like to ask the panelists? Let me know.

The race to reach 1,000,000 supporters on Facebook

Saturday, January 27th, 2007

RunObama.com: Talking ‘Bout An Obama Facebook Revolution

On January 16, someone named Farouk Olu Aregbe created an Obama Facebook Group with the (admittedly) audacious goal of reaching one million members. The group, entitled “Barack Obama (One Million Strong for Barack)” even had a timeline for reaching one million:

A million members would easily it largest Facebook group period (I believe). And it would dwarf, no swamp, any other single political group out there. For example, The Democratic Party’s Facebook group has only 4,480 members, the College Democrats clock in at 3,374.

But of course, 10,000, which was reached on January 20th, is a long way from 1,000,000.

Yesterday, when I blogged about the group on RunObama.com, I noticed it had grown from 66,599 to 66,730 in a matter of minutes as I was writing about it. Which means the group added 56,730 members in just 5 days, which opened my eyes.

But nothing compared to today, when I logged in at around 3:30pm to find that the group had grown to 90,094 members.

As of right now, the group has 127,774 members.

Via Personal Democracy Forum: One Million Strong for Barack?

Jaxtr private beta: Ready to take your phone calls

Friday, January 26th, 2007

I’m playing with Jaxtr:

Jaxtr was founded in October 2005 by Phillip Mobin and Touraj Parang with the mission to bring voice to social networks and blogs. With the free jaxtr service, users can link their phones with their online network to hear from callers worldwide while keeping their existing phone numbers private.

And jaxtr is not just about hearing from people who visit a user’s profile or blog. By adding their jaxtr link to their email signature, global friends can call our users on their phone with the click of the mouse – without downloading any software, incurring international phone charges or even registering for jaxtr.

When users change their work, home or mobile number, they simply add or update their number on jaxtr; incoming calls then get routed to the phone of their choice. They can even block callers from reaching them or specify on a per-caller basis which callers can reach them live and which get routed to voice mail. Isn’t that sweet?

Techcrunch did a little write-up in December: Jaxtr Widget Lets Social Networkers Chat On Real Live Phones

With the launch of jaxtr’s beta, the company also announced that LinkedIn co-founder Konstantin Guericke has joined the company as chief executive officer.

“There is nothing less satisfying than creating a social network page or blog and not getting a response,” said Guericke. “Social networks are a catalyst for people to meet, and jaxtr ‘jacks up’ the power of networks to help users make new connections. By putting a widget on their social network page or blog, jaxtr users can hear from callers worldwide on their existing landline or mobile phone.”

This thing is wired to my cell for now. Feel free to give it a try, just keep in mind I may be in a different time zone than you are (I’m on the West Coast).  Try not to wake me up in the middle of the night.
I get the feeling I need to switch to a three-column design soon to make space for all these widget things.

How to RSVP on Zvents?

Wednesday, January 24th, 2007

I’m a very happy user of Upcoming. Upcoming is a social calendar (now part of Yahoo!). It allows you to find, share, and follow events online. It is social to the point where I now get more than half of my events via my 80+ immediate contacts: I follow their “event stream” and pick out the things that I also like — works like a charm.

Today, I wanted to RSVP for the Lunch 2.0 meeting in Mountain View tomorrow. You can RSVP on their blog or on Zvents. So I thought I give Zvents a try.

Here’s the event on Zvents: Lunch 2.0

Two questions which I couldn’t get answered so far:

  • Where on the page can I RSVP?
  • Who else is going?

Either I’m totally blind, or maybe I’m missing the point and Zvents is not a social calendar?

Anyone have a clue please fill me in.

Widgets, Shmidgets?

Thursday, January 18th, 2007

Valleywag says the enthusiasm for widgets is “entirely out of proportion to their importance” and gives five reasons why: Against widgets

4. Business model. Finally, enthusiasm for widgets is contributing to unhealthy internet hype. Some companies, such as Imagelooop, are raising money specifically to develop tools for Myspace users. Let’s get something straight here. A widget is an affiliate marketing program, no more, no less; the maker is entirely dependent on the tolerance of the page’s owner or a network such as Myspace. Any widget maker that tries to sneak in their own advertising — and most of them entertain such fantasies — will be swiftly slapped down.

Which is exactly what might be happening right now, as GigaOm reports: MySpace Blocking Widgets?

Our instinct on this one is that it is a test, and FIM is testing how far they can push the widget makers. Saber rattling is the word, but we would appreciate your feedback in realtime. If FIM does decide to erect a toll booth, well the widget economy is going to have its first fiscal crisis. We will follow-up with FIM and find out.

A few more ideas for what could work.

Peuplade — Le premier site de Quartier

Saturday, January 13th, 2007

Interesting neighborhood social networking project from Paris, France: Peuplade

Un site de quartier, pour quoi faire ?

  • Pour redécouvrir son quartier
    Restaurants, ballades, cafés, coins secrets,…
  • Pour échanger biens, services ou coups de main à proximité de chez soi
    Petites annonces, plantes à arroser, chats à nourrir, dépannages, gardes improvisées, courses,…
  • Pour participer aux apéros, sorties et dîners
    Rendez-vous minute au café du coin, pétanques, pots de bienvenue, plans « restau », dîners chez les uns et les autres…
  • Pour participer à des projets de quartier
    Maison de quartier, gazette, court-métrage, groupe solidarité, voyages collectifs, concerts privés,…

Peuplade est en somme un cousin des blogs de quartier, des apéros et repas entre voisins, des maisons des associations, des réseaux d’échange de savoir,…

BBC News reports: Parisian neighbours meet online

Just as most Parisians are too cool to visit the Eiffel Tower, most of us ignore the possibilities for friendships immediately outside our front door.

French social networking website Peuplade aims to bridge that small but often insurmountable gap by putting neighbours in touch with each other. It also wants you to meet people different from your usual crowd.

“In life today we get to meet people in a very specific situation and social background. You meet people from your school, from your family or from your work,” said Jérémie Chouraqui, a lawyer and one of the founders of Peuplade.

“With Peuplade you will meet people that you will usually not get to meet in cities: people with different ages and social backgrounds, but they all live in the same neighbourhood.”

The site is effectively a neighbourhood notice-board which started life in Paris’s 17th arrondisement and is now spreading to the rest of the city.

[...]

Peuplade aims to change the way we make friends and the sort of people we make friends with - when you sign up you leave your prejudices at the door.

“We have a profile page in which we ask you a series of questions. We don’t ask your age, sex or job because that can lead to discrimination. We encourage you to leave a photo or image that moves you, rather than a photo of yourself,” said Stephane Legouffe, a sociologist and one of the co-ordinators of the site.

[...]

Founder Nathan Stern said: “The idea from the start was to create links between people who shouldn’t really meet, who don’t really have an affinity, who aren’t part of the same group or network.

“How do we do that? We go beyond group status and membership and create accidents, chaos. And when you come to these Apero de quartier for a while you develop a familiarity among people who you previously not think of belonging to your world.”

Rules of engagement

Apparently there is a science to this sort of social engineering.

One rule is that breaking the ice is often easier on the net. Another is if you are hosting a party of people who have never met, choose a tiny venue.

It seems elbow-to-elbow people are forced to get along.

Alors, je m’inscris…