Archive for the 'Social Media' Category

Wikileaks

Tuesday, January 16th, 2007

Another large-scale wiki project:

Wikileaks is developing an uncensorable Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis. Our primary interests are oppressive regimes in Asia, the former Soviet bloc, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the west who wish to reveal unethical behavior in their own governments and corporations. We aim for maximum political impact; this means our interface is identical to Wikipedia and usable by non-technical people. We have received over 1.2 million documents so far from dissident communities and anonymous sources.

We believe that transparency in government activities leads to reduced corruption, better government and stronger democracies. Many governments would benefit from increased scrutiny by the world community, as well as their own people. We believe this scrutiny requires information. Historically that information has been costly - in terms of human life and human rights. Wikileaks will facilitate safety in the ethical leaking movement.

Wikileaks opens leaked documents up to a much more exacting scrutiny than any media organization or intelligence agency could provide. Wikileaks will provide a forum for the entire global community to examine any document for credibility, plausibility, veracity and falsifiability. They will be able to interpret documents and explain their relevance to the public. If a document comes from the Chinese government, the entire Chinese dissident community can freely scrutinize and discuss it; if a document arrives from Iran, the entire Farsi community can analyze it and put it in context.

Who is behind Wikileaks?

Wikileaks was founded by Chinese dissidents, mathematicians and startup company technologists, from the US, Taiwan, Europe, Australia and South Africa.

Our advisory board, which is still forming, includes representatives from expatriate Russian and Tibetan refugee communities, reporters, a former US intelligence analyst and cryptographers.

There are currently 22 people directly involved in the project and counting.

Via SmartMobs: Freedom of Information, the Wiki Way

Jim Lehrer on journalism

Sunday, January 14th, 2007

From Jim Lehrer, probably one of America’s finest journalists (and host of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS): yet more journalism guidelines.

For journalists, obviously, but also for bloggers who claim (or aspire) to be journalists.

Rocky Mountains PBS: Jim Lehrer in Denver

Jim Lehrer, anchor of “The NewsHour,” was in Denver December 8 for a Rocky Mountain PBS 50th anniversary luncheon. Lehrer spoke to a packed room at the Pinnacle Club about his career with “The NewsHour,” his work moderating presidential debates, his new novel — and even his early days as a Continental Trailways ticket agent in Victoria, Texas. Watch portions of Lehrer’s talk by topic or watch the entire speech below.

From his speech:

I was asked whether I had any personal guidelines we use in our practice of journalism on The NewsHour. Here’s part of what I sent them. Our guidelines, my guidelines.

  • Do nothing I cannot defend.
  • Cover, write, and present every story with the care I would want if the story were about me.
  • Assume there is at least one other side or version to every story.
  • Assume the viewer is as smart, and as caring, and as good a person as I am.
  • Assume the same about all people on whom I report.
  • Assume personal lives are a private matter unless a legitimate turn in the story absolutely mandates otherwise.
  • Carefully separate opinion and analysis from straight news stories and clearly label everything.
  • Do not use anonymous sources or blind quotes except on rare and monumental occasions.
  • No one should ever be allowed to attack another anonymously.
  • And finally, I am not in the entertainment business.

Those are our guidelines.

Can you spell “highest standards”?  Setting up a blog is the easy part.

Who is Chris Dodd?

Thursday, January 11th, 2007

Chris Dodd is a Democratic US Senator from Connecticut. As of today, he’s running for president.

Is there social media? Yes, there is:

Here’s a full-length quote from the initial blog post:

Never before has there been a presidential campaign with so many candidates attempting to recruit and mobilize supporters from within the netroots. Almost all will have blogs looking for their own niche in a crowded field. Some will focus on the wonkish policy details, some will encourage suggestions while providing opportunities for meaningful participation, and some will copy and paste favorable news articles into the body of posts and call it day.

We’ll do all of those things here too.

But at its best, we will provide the kind of “window” into a presidential campaign never seen before while serving as a robust vehicle for two-way communication between Senator Dodd, the campaign, supporters, undecideds and even critics.

That means lots of video — especially the kind of stuff you won’t catch in 30 second clips on the nightly news. It means lots of voices — starting with our internet team, but it also means you will hear directly from Senator Dodd, campaign staff, interns, volunteers, supporters, and again, critics from across the country.

Ultimately, our goals for the campaign blog rely heavily on citizen participation. Of course, comment on the site and upload your photos to the Flickr Group. But we encourage everyone to step outside the box and into the (You)Tubes to add video … both as “reporters” from events nationwide, and also as part of the ongoing “start the conversation” program with Senator Dodd.

That said, take a moment to add the blog’s RSS Feed to your Reader. We look forward to having you check back in and participate often.

Tim Cullen

P.S.: We’ll turn on comments for the blog later today. We promise!

Did I say the 2008 race will be interesting? Oh yeah, baby!

Web Monday, January 2007: Bielefeld, Berlin, Kiel, Stuttgart, Vienna, Bremen, Cologne, Karlsruhe, Jena, Frankfurt, Silicon Valley

Wednesday, January 10th, 2007

With a total of eleven Web Mondays, January is shaping up to be our busiest month yet.

You know what to do:

  • Mark your calendars, spread the word, bring your friends, bring your colleagues (heck, bring your boss)!
  • Share your insights, give a remarkable talk, or demo your hot, new, curve-jumping, paradigm-shifting, patent-pending, world-changing, revolutionary, first-mover app!!
  • Have fun inventing the future of the internet!

January 15:

January 22:

January 29:

One of my key goals for the development and further growth of Web Monday in 2007 is better sharing across what will soon be 20 different locations.

I would like to take the opportunity and encourage everyone to make sure their demos, presentations and talks at every event get recorded or otherwise properly documented (photos, podcasts, videos — you name it) so we can make them available online.

Yes, Web Monday is about to get its own blog shortly (and podcast, I assume).

Happy New Year!

Podcamp Berlin, January 12-14

Wednesday, January 10th, 2007

Since everybody really seemed to have liked the general concept, why not do another one?

Podcamp Berlin is upon us:

Podcamp Berlin is a free, two-day ad hoc conference on blogging, internet TV, new media, and podcasting. It will be the first event of its kind outside of the US.

Podcamp is an interdisciplinary event for media creators (amateurs and professionals), consumers, service providers, social scientists, lawyers, economists, entrepreneurs, consultants, and investors. Participants talk and learn about the essentials of content, business models, concepts, and advertising of today and tomorrow in the area of new media.

More than 100 people have signed up (a German who’s who in podcasting and social media), but there is still room for last minute campers.

Follow the blog for updates (in German).

Naturally, things kick off Friday night with a little party.

Have fun, everybody!

Philipp Lenssen SEO tutorial

Sunday, January 7th, 2007

Philipp has a nice tutorial today: The Basics of Search Engine Optimization

Basically, you’d want to:

  1. Write good content.
  2. Be accessible.
  3. Engage in the community.

Yes, it’s that simple.

Obama ‘12

Sunday, January 7th, 2007

Has Barack Obama announced his 2008 candidacy for president yet? You gotta admit, he comes across as a very positive, down-to-earth guy in TV interviews.

Don’t know what his chances are in 2008, but maybe a run in 2012? He would be 51 by then.

Btw, while he seems to have a Facebook profile (as of now, there are 2252 “wall posts”, or personal comments by other Facebook users), I can’t find a blog on his campaign website yet.

Anyway, the 2008 race will be fun to watch in many ways, especially with the use of social media and all.