Archive for the 'Social Media' Category

About that Twitter thing…

Sunday, February 1st, 2009

I signed up for Twitter way early in 2006 (check my RSS feed, it shows a relatively small number) but only started really using it at SXSW 2007 in Austin, TX.

It was initially meant as an experiment to just give it a try, see how it works and then decide if I really needed it. Well, that experiment has lasted for almost two years now (we know it’s addictive).

Twitter has grown tremendously over the past two years and so has my usage. There are at least seven accounts I use on a regular basis (one personal, a few various business and product ones, a couple of community events etc.).

There’s definitely been a lot of cool stuff to see and I still enjoy being amidst this new thing (micro-blogging, whatever) — except for one big problem: it’s too distracting and it costs too much time.

It’s not so bad with the smaller accounts that have up to a couple hundred followers/following, lower posting frequency (less than daily) and are focused around one specific niche topic.

But my personal Twitter stream has become a real drag. Too much noise. Too little signal. And as much as I appreciate that Twitter is stable after the problems we saw last year, the fact that there’s been feature standstill doesn’t help much either: no groups, no ability to fine tune tweet volume, no easy way to manage your followers and followed — pretty much all the basics needed to help me manage are still missing. I’m sure there’s an application out there somewhere that does some of that but seriously, who has the time to go on that quest?

Anyway, time to clear out some of the brush (sorry to un-follow you). And probably step away from it entirely for a while and see if the world still turns.

My most favorite use of Twitter this past year

Wednesday, January 21st, 2009

Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at NYU and avid Twitterer (btw, must-follow for anyone interested in the future of media and journalism), was preparing an essay recently on “why I use Twitter”: Help Me Explain Twitter to Eggheads

He asked his readers for contributions on one particular item:

9. And then, the thing I need your help with: what do I actually use Twitter for?.

I have a number of answers to that, which I will lay out in the piece, but I would like to feature some others. The intent of my question is to put the accent on “useful.” What do you use Twitter for? I’m especially interested if you’re an academic—student, teacher, PhD—but my interest is not limited to those groups.

Here’s my answer (sent via Twitter, natch):

@jayrosen_nyu To follow people outside my liberal, Bay Area echo chamber. Hard to bear at times, but can be great sanity check. ;-)

Following last year’s trip to DC (Politics Online conference, eDemocracyCamp) and Austin (SXSW), I made a deliberate attempt to follow more people who are not like me (in terms of where we fall on the political spectrum — we all have in common that we are hooked on Twitter, apparently): Republicans, conservatives, evangelicals etc.

This has proven to be my most valuable use of Twitter by far. It has provided me with a glimpse into the other half of this nation’s soul, which has been so deeply divided over the last eight years (and still is, though I’m hopeful that now is a good time for new beginnings, and maybe we will see some of this division disappear).

It’s been fascinating to read up on some of the articles, stories and other resources that are being passed on by conservatives, to listen to their instant feedback to news of the day, and to follow the discussions around the need for change in their own party.

It is easier today than ever to blend out any news source we don’t agree with and only engage with people who will confirm our views. It is important, in my view, that we resist this temptation, and Twitter seems to be a good antenna into anywhere outside the bubbles of our own limited world views.

Seesmic

Monday, December 3rd, 2007

First Seesmic post.

Change agent at work

Monday, November 12th, 2007

Just for the record:

  • Late March (immediately after landing the job) — Started pushing for team/group/department wiki.
  • April 15, 2007 — Started spreading some Twitter love.
  • April 19, 2007 — Started evangelizing the unconference format and its potential benefits in and around the enterprise.
  • No later than early May 2007 — Started pointing folks to Silicon Valley’s vibrant Lunch 2.0 movement.
  • Etc.

Since then:

  • July 2007 — First internal Lunch 2.0 at Oracle.
  • August 2007 — Oracle is BarCampBlock sponsor.
  • September 2007 — Department wiki launches (internal).
  • October 2007 — First public Oracle Lunch 2.0.
  • November 2007 — Public wiki launches, OpenWorld comes nicely bundled with an unconference, Twitter seems to be all over the place at Oracle.
  • Etc.

Of course, none of this would have been possible if it wasn’t for the curiosity, open-mindedness and drive of a number of other people at Oracle (both inside and outside the sphere of influence a small team like ours can command). That’s what’s made this job such a fun experience over the past few months. And while I’m well aware that I can’t claim credit for all the good things that have been coming together lately, I’m glad that I was able to give some of the right queues at the right time.

n2eu — NetSquared Europe shaping up?

Saturday, July 7th, 2007

Dan McQuillan, the web manager for Amnesty International, is working on the idea of launching NetSquared in Europe: UPDATE on Netsquared - the European Remix

About NetSquared:

Our mission is to spur responsible adoption of social web tools by social benefit organizations. There’s a whole new generation of online tools available — tools that make it easier than ever before to collaborate, share information and mobilize support. These tools include blogs, wikis, RSS feeds, podcasting, and more. Some people describe them as “Web 2.0″; we call them the social web, because their power comes from the relationships they enable.

They are the makers of the annual NetSquared Conference, which was great last year and which I was unfortunate to miss this year.
More information about the n2eu initiative can be found on their wiki.

Via NetSquared: Net2EU: Join the NetSquared Europe List Serv and Wiki

Personal Democracy Forum 2007: I have an extra ticket an I'm giving it away for free!

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

Update: Registration is now closed. The happy winner will be notified shortly.

Well, almost for free. Read on.

Some background:

I’ve been working on a little side project in the area of online dialogue and deliberation over the past few months. Nothing much to show yet, but we’re slowly making progress. I can brief you if you’re interested.

In March, I attended the Politics Online Conference 2007 in Washington D.C., which was quite insightful. Based on a few recommendations from people I respect, I bought my ticket to the 4th Annual Personal Democracy Forum shortly afterwards. PDF will be held in New York City on May 18, and I was really looking forward to going as it looks like it will be an interesting event with lots of interesting people (plus, it’s New York so what more to ask).

Unfortunately, I won’t be able to go. I have a wedding to attend that Saturday which also requires my involvement on Friday. And being that I’m in California there is no way I can make the trip (trust me, I checked).

Now, I don’t want to let my ticket go to waste. I checked with the organizers and it’s ok to transfer the ticket to someone else. It’s a USD 295 value (I paid USD 245 for early registration).

Here’s how you can pick it up.

You:

  • Are interested in politics and the internet, and how the two fit together.
  • May have a background in dialogue and deliberation (if you follow this organization you probably know what I’m talking about).
  • Can be a student (or anyone, really, who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford the conference).
  • You have your own blog and are comfortable using social media.

In return, here’s what I would like to ask of you:

  • In addition to the paid conference, you should make sure to participate in the PDF Unconference on Saturday, May 19 as well.
  • As much as possible and as much as your time during the day allows, you should document both events using whatever kind of social media you’re comfortable with (blogging, podcasting, video, Twitter — you name it).

There are no strings attached. I’m giving away the ticket for free and it’s up to you what you do with it. I won’t hold you accountable if you don’t blog etc. However, if you do I will link to you prominently.

If you’re interested, feel free to leave a comment or contact me directly. If you know someone for whom you think this might be a good opportunity, please pass them on to me.

I hope this works out and I look forward to seeing next week’s reports from the conference.

Is my blogging suffering?

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

I don’t think so. It’s just happening more on Twitter these days.

LinkedIn has a blog (finally)

Thursday, April 26th, 2007

LinkedIn just launched their new blog: Your window to LinkedIn

Via Jeremiah Owyang: Community Evangelism isn’t just about Marketing, and LinkedIn takes the second step

Twitter, Inc.

Wednesday, April 18th, 2007

Ever heard of Twitter? Well, Twitter is now Twitter, Inc.

Via GigaOm: Twitter Leaves the Nest

San Jose 95128: Reporting from Silicon Valley for German newspaper Welt.de

Saturday, April 7th, 2007

I was recently invited to blog at Welt.de (the online edition of Germany daily newspaper DIE WELT).

The blog is in German and is called San Jose 95128.

I’ll be covering people, events, startups and anything else that makes this place interesting. I’ll also try to pay special attention to any kind of transatlantic transfer of ideas between Germany and the US.

I’m always happy to hear from my readers. Comments are open. Feel free to let me know your thoughts or what topics you’re interested in.