Archive for the 'Community' Category

The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

Came across this movie tonight somewhat by accident. Very cool!

The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces

This witty and original film is about the open spaces of cities and why some of them work for people while others don’t. Beginning at New York’s Seagram Plaza, one of the most used open areas in the city, the film proceeds to analyze why this space is so popular and how other urban oases, both in New York and elsewhere, measure up. Based on direct observation of what people actually do, the film presents a remarkably engaging and informative tour of the urban landscape and looks at how it can be made more hospitable to those who live in it.

You can buy it here for $95 or watch it in full on Youtube (part one through six):

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2GfOhFZkY8
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aioLKJfxQV4
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_nw8HJ2yAE
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFT_DakPk1Y
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIOteCQHJmk
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iA0Vqr770Zs

Here’s part one:

Trupoli: First look at participation/engagement metrics

Saturday, December 29th, 2007

Note: Article originally blogged on Flickr on Dec 27, 2007.

Earlier this month, Munich, Germany-based Trupoli ended their closed beta phase and officially launched the site to the public. Trupoli lets you capture, share and evaluate statements by German politicians (federal, state, local) along criteria of credibility, agreement, and importance.

Trupoli: Top politicians (sort by popularity)

Time to take a first look at some basic participation/engagement metrics (as of 2007/12/27):

General

Total # of registered users: unknown (was approx. 1,000 at the time of launch according to the press release)

Total # of politicians (profiles): 3,910
Total # of statements: 2,484

# of politicians with at least one statement: 344 (8.8%)

# of statements per politician: 0.6
# of statements per politician with at least one statement: 7.2

Top 50 politicians (sorted by popularity):

# of politicians: 50 (1.3% of total)
# of statements: 1,674 (67.4% of total)
# of evaluations: 16,891
# of evaluations per statement: 10.1

Conclusion

Still too early for these numbers to be meaningful, though the patterns of a long tail seem to be showing (less than two percent of politicians have more than two thirds of all statements associated with them, while over 90 percent of all politicians do not have any statements associated).

It certainly is an interesting project, and it may take some time for its value to become apparent. My guess is that we’ll have a much better idea where things are headed by the end of Q1/2008.

Startups without name nor face

Monday, September 17th, 2007

I always find it surprising:

You sign up for a beta invite. Time passes. One day, you get an email after all stating the app, project whatever is now live. You sign up, you log in, and then, when you try to see who’s behind all this — nothing. No names. No pictures. No (real) address. No background info whatsoever about the founders or the team or the management or the backers or the first customers or their mother or their cat. Nothing. Nada. Zilch.

Sorry, but what do you think this is? Hide and seek?

I’d have to go back and look through all my beta invites to confirm this, but off the top of my hat I’d argue that the sites that get it (i.e. are social, community-oriented, and web 2.0 in the best meaning of the word etc.) don’t usually have this problem. Only the crappy, convoluted, un-pretty, also-ran, wannabe sites tend to lean towards keeping the most basic information forever secret.

Anyway, if you’re a startup, and your main concern is to hide from your early adopters who they are dealing with — you’re probably on the wrong track.

Civic sensemaking

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

Just sayin’.

List of collaborative translation tools

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

I’m quite fascinated by the opportunities or large-group collaboration.

I recently thought about how crowdsourcing could best be applied to the translation process, and came across the following projects or services (may not all be active anymore, but listed here nonetheless):

  • Babels — Babels is an international network of volunteer interpreters and translators whose main objective is to cover the interpreting needs of the Social Forums.
  • Cucumis — Free online translation service
    Cucumis is a community of translators who share their linguistic knowledge and help each other online.
  • DotSUB — Any film in any language.
  • nativetext — nativetext is a free web service that translates RSS feeds from blogs and podcasts into foreign languages. (site defunct, archived version available on Archive.org)
  • Speakeasy — Speakeasy is an integrated internet and telephone service that connects new immigrants with a network of multilingual volunteers who answer questions, give advice, and provide language interpretation over the phone. Speakeasy’s novel approach to community networking leverages the ubiquity of cell phones to create a model of “just in time” civic engagement, enabling volunteers to remain “on-call” to their community wherever they might be.
  • Traduwiki — Anybody is a translator
    Traduwiki’s mission is to use the power of ‘we’ to translate the most interesting documents. Explore the thousands of docs already uploaded, contribute two phrases at a time and let’s spread the best stuff.
  • Worldwide Lexicon Project — Translating The Web To And From Any Human Language
    The Worldwide Lexicon is an experimental project to make translating websites, blogs and real-time IM conversations easy and accurate, using a combination of human and machine translation. The project was created several years ago by Brian McConnell, a telecommunications entrepreneur and inventor.

Anything else out there that should be mentioned? Feel free to leave a comment.

Is my blogging suffering?

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

I don’t think so. It’s just happening more on Twitter these days.

Looks like Germany was really missing an online community slash social network for parents, uh, moms…

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007

Going through my feeds today I come across another two new social networks for mothers:

  • Mamily.de — Online community for mothers (Hamburg, Germany)
  • PaulsMama.de — Social network for families (Hamburg, Germany)
  • Netmoms.de — By mothers for mothers (Cologne, Germany)

PaulsMama I had heard of before. And there may be at least one more project based in Berlin that’s currently in the making that I’m aware of.

Not surprising to finally see this level of actvity. There must be a least half a dozen similar projects in the US already.

I’m on Twitter

Monday, March 5th, 2007

You know what to do…

CommunityNext: The Patent-Pending skinnyCorp Method for Creating Online Awesomeness and Other Cool Stuff

Monday, February 26th, 2007

This is another session from CommunityNext that I think really stood out.

The Threadless project started as a hobby. The goal was never to turn it into money — the founders were simply interested in art.

Again, it’s people doing what they are passionate about and doing it very, very well, and Jeffrey Kalmikoff and Jake Nickell of skinnyCorp give a prime example of that. Their motto is: “If we’re not having fun, we’re done!” (their measuring metric: a fun scale).

Their four commandments are:

  1. Allow your content to be created by its community (and by content they mean pretty much anything).
  2. Put your project in the hands of its community.
  3. Let your community grow itself.
  4. Reward the community that makes your project possible.

I mean, think of how much fun it must be to be able to come up with stuff like this (at work, that is).

Watch the video here.

CommunityNext: Founders Panel — How They Got to over 5 Million Members and What Is Next

Monday, February 26th, 2007

I found this panel at CommunityNext to be insightful, inspirational, and very entertaining. Gives a good glimpse into what I see is the spirit of Silicon Valley (or, in a way, the West Coast in general).

Bottom line: Do what you’re passionate about and give it your best shot!

The video is now on Youtube.

Panelists (from left to right):

Moderated by Guy Kawasaki.

By the way, I couldn’t find the original image that started it all on Fark’s website, but if you Google for “squirrel nuts” you get the idea. Go figure!