Archive for the 'Social Software' Category

Is my blogging suffering?

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

I don’t think so. It’s just happening more on Twitter these days.

Twitter, Inc.

Wednesday, April 18th, 2007

Ever heard of Twitter? Well, Twitter is now Twitter, Inc.

Via GigaOm: Twitter Leaves the Nest

Can Twitter fight spam?

Wednesday, March 21st, 2007

Eric Rice is about to find out: Experiment: TwitterMail me until 3/23

Greetings from Washington, DC

Sunday, March 18th, 2007

It’s been a busy week. I have a few more hours to spend in sunny Washington, DC before I head back to the Bay Area. Lots of interesting content to digest, and a long list of people to follow up with.

Both South By Southwest Interactive as well as the Politics Online Conference 2007 were worth going, and I’ll try to be back next year.

Using Twitter extensively at SXSW was a fun experiment. To me, it was yet another glimpse into the future when everybody’s location will be a known fact at any given time more or less and where it will seem perfectly normal to make use of that information for the purpose of social interaction.

I’m on Twitter

Monday, March 5th, 2007

You know what to do…

At CommunityNext today

Saturday, February 10th, 2007

I’m at CommunityNext in Stanford today. And when I come back, I will monetize the living #$*! out of you, my dear reader community.

Any important issues I should look out for? Anything you’d like to ask the panelists? Let me know.

Wiki Wednesday back with a vengeance!

Wednesday, February 7th, 2007

There are well over 50 people at Wiki Wednesday tonight. We’re just going through some interesting stuff that got hacked during today’s Wikithon:

  • Wiki References
  • Wiki Analytics
  • SocialZork
  • Who What When (tag cloud)
  • Tag Cloud
  • Top 10/Bottom 21 Best
  • Purple Transclusion (more on the concept of purple wiki)

Yummy!

Update: Christine has more details.

Jimmy Wales: Three principles for building the Wikipedia community

Wednesday, January 24th, 2007

At last week’s Social Media Club meeting in San Francisco, Jimmy Wales of Wikipedia shared some of the guiding principles used for building the Wikipedia community:

  1. “Assume good faith!”
  2. Intentional vulnerability
  3. Accountability rather than gatekeeping

He says these principles also apply to a wide range of internet or social media projects.

You can listen to his 6-minute speech here (starts at around 20′55).

More on AssumeGoodFaith on the Meatball wiki.

How to RSVP on Zvents?

Wednesday, January 24th, 2007

I’m a very happy user of Upcoming. Upcoming is a social calendar (now part of Yahoo!). It allows you to find, share, and follow events online. It is social to the point where I now get more than half of my events via my 80+ immediate contacts: I follow their “event stream” and pick out the things that I also like — works like a charm.

Today, I wanted to RSVP for the Lunch 2.0 meeting in Mountain View tomorrow. You can RSVP on their blog or on Zvents. So I thought I give Zvents a try.

Here’s the event on Zvents: Lunch 2.0

Two questions which I couldn’t get answered so far:

  • Where on the page can I RSVP?
  • Who else is going?

Either I’m totally blind, or maybe I’m missing the point and Zvents is not a social calendar?

Anyone have a clue please fill me in.

Politicopia

Monday, January 22nd, 2007

From the Beehive State comes another wiki project that aims at bridging the gap between citizens and people in office:

Politicopia gives people a solid handle on the Utah Legislature. Users create summaries of bills, pro and con arguments, comments, links, and more. For example, check out these pages:

Payday Lending
Vouchers for Private School Tuition
In-State Tuition for Illegal Aliens

Help Wanted. Anyone can edit or create a page. To discourage trolls and spammers, registration is required. This is an experiment in open democracy.

On the pro and con arguments, please stick to your side. If you don’t like the other side’s argument, rebut it on the other side of the ledger or tear it apart in the comments.

Be cool.

This is in some ways similar to Campaigns Wikia (which doesn’t seem to be very active at this point, as far as I can tell).

One challenge I see with a pure wiki approach in this context is the fact that in order for participants to contribute they must make edits. And while that is ok when collaboratively writing a document, it does not scale well when it comes to any type of polling or voting.

Secondly, the unstructured nature of the data makes filtering, aggregation, or visualization — in short, anything that helps with the consumption of large amounts of data — very difficult.

Via Personal Democracy Forum: The Revolution Will Be Wikified