Archive for the 'Online political campaigning' Category

DLD Internet Politics Study

Monday, January 26th, 2009

For those interested in internet politics and online campaigning in Germany, the recently released “DLD Internet Politics Study” (article, PDF download) may be of interest.

I left the following comment to point out a slight error (re-posting it here while it’s awaiting approval):

DLD_Internet_Politics_20_01_09.pdf (page 18)

The study may contain a slight oversight.

On page 18 (PDF), the title suggests that the site “Can We Ask” somehow encouraged video dialogue with candidate Obama as part of the Obama campaign’s official toolkit (along with Flickr, Eventful and the other tools listed on the previous pages).

However, “Can We Ask” was a negative campaigning micro-site paid for by the Republican National Committee (RNC). According to Republican internet strategist David All, it was “an extremely clever deployment of YouTube to effectively hammer Barrack Obama by blending the RNC’s opposition research team with real questions submitted by real citizens.” (Source: http://bit.ly/3dcl)

The site is still live: http://net.gop.com/canweask/

The screenshot used in the study (see image above) does not show the disclaimer or footer information. But if you look closely the main link below the video include says “A Questionable Candidate” (in German: “ein zweifelhafter Kandidat”) which pretty much gives it away that this is not in support of Obama.

Nice to see that the presentation contains a few screenshots from the Flickr pool I created a few weeks ago.

New Flickr group: Online Campaigning in Germany (Internet-Wahlkampf in Deutschland)

Friday, December 19th, 2008

Following my efforts to collect a few snapshots and impressions from the recent US presidential (online) campaigns, I thought I’d start the same for Germany, where 2009 looks like it might be a big election year (federal parliament, president, various state parliaments, European parliament etc.).

Since I probably won’t have the time to cover everything, I started a new group on Flickr:

Online Campaigning in Germany (Internet-Wahlkampf in Deutschland)

This group tracks innovations and interest finds around online campaigning in Germany.

Diese Gruppe sammelt Innovationen und interessante Fundstücke rund um Internet-Wahlkampf in Deutschland.

It’s open for anyone to join and contribute.

While many doubt that Germany is ready for significant advances in fully embracing the internet as the tool for political campaigns in 2009 (if ever), I am pretty confident that a few candidates will figure it out.

Either way, let’s see what evidence we can find together.

PolitCamp Graz: May 30-31, 2008 in Graz, Austria

Friday, January 18th, 2008

About PolitCamp Graz (in German):

Das PolitCamp soll eine Unkonferenz zum Thema Politische Kommunikation im Web 2.0 werden, wobei die detaillierte inhaltliche Vorbereitung Sache der Teilnehmer ist. Dazu ist dieses Wiki da. Wir hoffen, dass viele Besucher kommen, für die Unkonferenzen dieses Typs neu sind: z.B. politisch Aktive, PR-Leute und Journalisten.

Bei einer Session auf dem letzten Wiener BarCamp haben wir Ideen für das PolitCamp gesammelt. Sehr gut hat mir dort die Formulierung gefallen: zeigen, was mit Web 2.0-Mitteln in der politischen Kommunikation heute möglich ist. Ein wichtiges Thema wird sicher auch der long tail der politischen Kommunikation sein: Wie kann die unbekannte Expertin das Web zur politischen Kommunikation nutzen, wie können die Betroffenen der Politik öffentlich kommunizieren?

I’ve taken the liberty to add the event to Upcoming.

Meet me at SXSW Interactive, March 7-11, 2008 in Austin, Texas

Thursday, January 17th, 2008

Just signed up for SXSW Interactive 2008.

Last year was a lot of fun, so looking very much forward to going again this year. SXSW 2007 was when Twitter really took off. See a list of Twitterers attending this year’s conference here: http://sxswtwitter.pbwiki.com. Given their recent performance issues during Steve Job’s keynote at Mac World, it’ll be interesting to watch whether the service will be as reliable and fun as it was last year. And fun it was, with half of Twitter’s then-userbase congregated in the same city (in a way, it almost felt like a location-based service). So here’s to hoping they can figure things out.

Also, if you’re coming to SXSW from Europe, I’m organizing Kraut by Southwest, a little get-together for the German and European community on Monday, March 11 (see Upcoming or Facebook for details).

SXSW will be my third event on this trip, following eDemocracyCamp (provided it actually happens, sign up on the wiki, Upcoming or on Facebook if you’re interested) and Politics Online Conference 2008, both of which will be held in Washington DC.

If all goes well, I will be able to share more details on a little project I’ve been working on over this past year, and which seems to finally be gaining some traction.

Election 2008: How are the pollsters doing?

Saturday, January 5th, 2008

Not so great.

Here is what Zogby predicted for Iowa on December 30, 2007, four days before the Iowa caucus: Reuters/C-SPAN/Zogby Poll: Clinton Leads Dems; GOP Deadlocked

  • Hillary Clinton: 31%
  • Barack Obama: 27%

Needless to say the actual results were slightly off. Now, we all know that polls come with fine print, margins of error, need to be interpreted etc. So while the Zogby poll may not have been “wrong” scientifically, it doesn’t seem to me to have been entirely accurate either.

Be that as it may, yesterday, on January 4, 2008, four days before the New Hampshire primaries, here’s what Zogby sees in the cards: Reuters/C-SPAN/Zogby New Hampshire Poll: McCain Leads Romney; Clinton Leads Obama as Edwards Hits 20%

  • Hillary Clinton: 32%
  • Barack Obama: 26%

It will be very interesting to watch how those numbers will change over the next 72 hours. And change they will, read my lips.

Trupoli: First look at participation/engagement metrics

Saturday, December 29th, 2007

Note: Article originally blogged on Flickr on Dec 27, 2007.

Earlier this month, Munich, Germany-based Trupoli ended their closed beta phase and officially launched the site to the public. Trupoli lets you capture, share and evaluate statements by German politicians (federal, state, local) along criteria of credibility, agreement, and importance.

Trupoli: Top politicians (sort by popularity)

Time to take a first look at some basic participation/engagement metrics (as of 2007/12/27):

General

Total # of registered users: unknown (was approx. 1,000 at the time of launch according to the press release)

Total # of politicians (profiles): 3,910
Total # of statements: 2,484

# of politicians with at least one statement: 344 (8.8%)

# of statements per politician: 0.6
# of statements per politician with at least one statement: 7.2

Top 50 politicians (sorted by popularity):

# of politicians: 50 (1.3% of total)
# of statements: 1,674 (67.4% of total)
# of evaluations: 16,891
# of evaluations per statement: 10.1

Conclusion

Still too early for these numbers to be meaningful, though the patterns of a long tail seem to be showing (less than two percent of politicians have more than two thirds of all statements associated with them, while over 90 percent of all politicians do not have any statements associated).

It certainly is an interesting project, and it may take some time for its value to become apparent. My guess is that we’ll have a much better idea where things are headed by the end of Q1/2008.

Meet me at Politics Online Conference 2008 in Washington DC

Wednesday, November 21st, 2007

I just signed up for Politics Online Conference 2008 in Washington DC (taking advantage of their early bird discount that gets you $150 off the regular price):

The Politics Online Conference sits at the intersection of smart politics, good governance, transparent democracy, and innovative technology, spotlighting tools, applications, strategies, and ideas that affect a range of functions, from writing policy to organizing democratic movements to running a smarter political campaign to building dialogue with your constituents.

People come to the Politics Online Conference to learn about cutting-edge trends and to gain access to the visionaries who make those trends possible. They come to find solutions. They come to discuss their ideas with other experts in the field and outside the Beltway. And they come to network.

The 2008 Politics Online Conference will be held at a new location, the Renaissance Washington, DC Hotel.

Here are the panels I would like to see (out of a list of panel nominations):

  • Laptop Quarterbacks: Are the Campaigns Listening? Should They?
  • Does Web 2.0 Work in Politics?
  • Emails to Congress: Coping with the Deluge
  • Technological outreach to minority/cultural groups
  • Assessing the Power of Political Games and Simulations
  • What’s the Matter with Kansas…Online? How Social Causes Have Replaced Economic Interests as Online Advocacy Motivators

You can vote here for your favorite panels.

The conference will take place March 4-5, 2008. I am organizing a barcamp on e-democracy the weekend immediately prior to the conference. So if you plan to be in town anyway, why not try the unconference thing and attend eDemocracyCamp? Simply sign up on the wiki, save the date on Facebook or Upcoming, or join our mailing list.

Here’s how we currently describe what eDemocracyCamp is all about:

eDemocracyCamp will be the first BarCamp with a focus specifically on e-democracy. eDemocracyCamp wants to connect citizens, researchers, developers, practitioners and anyone else interested in the topic to learn about the current state of e-democracy and share their visions for its future direction. Topics may include (but aren’t limited to): e-democracy, e-participation, e-government, e-voting, online civic engagement, online political campaigning, online dialogue and deliberation. Technical tracks may cover things like the importance of open standards, hacktivism, mashups etc.

The general goal is to learn/share how the web can help us better govern ourselves, support democratic structures, make online civic participation more accessible, convenient, fun, efficient etc.

  • What is out there today (in terms of tools, processes, projects, products, initiatives etc.)?
  • What works, doesn’t work, needs work?
  • What are opportunities for collaboration as we move forward?

Diversity is key: The more people we have who come to this from different angles, the better.

Hope you join us. See you there!

eDemocracyCamp: March 1-2, 2008 in Washington DC

Tuesday, October 16th, 2007

I thought this might be a fun thing to try: eDemocracyCamp

Sign up on the wiki if you’re interested in attending or want to help out with organizing.

This is the weekend immediately prior to 2008 Politics Online Conference, and of course the idea is to get a hold of some of the folks who will be in town anyway.

Still plenty of time left, still early idea stage. Let’s see how this goes…

Personal Democracy Forum 2007: I have an extra ticket an I'm giving it away for free!

Thursday, May 10th, 2007

Update: Registration is now closed. The happy winner will be notified shortly.

Well, almost for free. Read on.

Some background:

I’ve been working on a little side project in the area of online dialogue and deliberation over the past few months. Nothing much to show yet, but we’re slowly making progress. I can brief you if you’re interested.

In March, I attended the Politics Online Conference 2007 in Washington D.C., which was quite insightful. Based on a few recommendations from people I respect, I bought my ticket to the 4th Annual Personal Democracy Forum shortly afterwards. PDF will be held in New York City on May 18, and I was really looking forward to going as it looks like it will be an interesting event with lots of interesting people (plus, it’s New York so what more to ask).

Unfortunately, I won’t be able to go. I have a wedding to attend that Saturday which also requires my involvement on Friday. And being that I’m in California there is no way I can make the trip (trust me, I checked).

Now, I don’t want to let my ticket go to waste. I checked with the organizers and it’s ok to transfer the ticket to someone else. It’s a USD 295 value (I paid USD 245 for early registration).

Here’s how you can pick it up.

You:

  • Are interested in politics and the internet, and how the two fit together.
  • May have a background in dialogue and deliberation (if you follow this organization you probably know what I’m talking about).
  • Can be a student (or anyone, really, who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford the conference).
  • You have your own blog and are comfortable using social media.

In return, here’s what I would like to ask of you:

  • In addition to the paid conference, you should make sure to participate in the PDF Unconference on Saturday, May 19 as well.
  • As much as possible and as much as your time during the day allows, you should document both events using whatever kind of social media you’re comfortable with (blogging, podcasting, video, Twitter — you name it).

There are no strings attached. I’m giving away the ticket for free and it’s up to you what you do with it. I won’t hold you accountable if you don’t blog etc. However, if you do I will link to you prominently.

If you’re interested, feel free to leave a comment or contact me directly. If you know someone for whom you think this might be a good opportunity, please pass them on to me.

I hope this works out and I look forward to seeing next week’s reports from the conference.

Greetings from Washington, DC

Sunday, March 18th, 2007

It’s been a busy week. I have a few more hours to spend in sunny Washington, DC before I head back to the Bay Area. Lots of interesting content to digest, and a long list of people to follow up with.

Both South By Southwest Interactive as well as the Politics Online Conference 2007 were worth going, and I’ll try to be back next year.

Using Twitter extensively at SXSW was a fun experiment. To me, it was yet another glimpse into the future when everybody’s location will be a known fact at any given time more or less and where it will seem perfectly normal to make use of that information for the purpose of social interaction.